Hacker HotWing 500 Flying Wing

Hacker HotWing 500 with painted leading edge and wing fences

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Current Power Setup

  • Motor: Eflite BL180 2500Kv, ~30W, 8g, ~3.5A
  • ESC: T-motor 6A
  • Prop: GWS 5030 (new style w/4mm hub)
  • Batteries: Gforce 2S 500mAh 30C, 31g

Current Radio Gear

  • Transmitter: Spektrum DX18 G1
  • Receiver: Spektrum AR400
  • Servos: Common Sense RC 3g (CSRC-35)

Current Specs

  • Wingspan: 19.6″ or 500mm
  • AUW: 3.98oz or 113g (wing w/o battery: 2.89oz or 82g)
  • CG: 100-105mm from the tip of the nose
  • Flight Time: 6 minutes

PDF Manuals, Specs & Instructions

CG and Final Build
After completing my build, I wound up putting 7g of lead in the nose to obtain CG at 90-100mm. After maiden flight and test-flying 5 additional batteries, I decided to remove 4 of the 7g, which put the CG closer to 100-105mm. The HotWing 500 flew much better at this CG. It was more agile, more floaty at slower airspeed and rolls were more axial.

Motor and Motormount
With the HotWing 500 being just a smaller version of the 750, I knew there was a good chance it would end up tail heavy so I took additional steps during the build. Instead of using the original plastic and foam motormount, I glued 2 thin pieces of light plywood to the rear edge of the foam with one piece sandwiched in between, as shown in the photos. This reduced static weight slightly as well as moved the motor forward about an inch to further help with CG. This motormount is plenty strong for the Eflite BL180 motor.

Hacker HotWing 500 with Eflite BL180 brushless motor (closeup)
Hacker HotWing 500 with Eflite BL180 brushless motor (closeup)

The li’l HotWing 500 flies great with an Eflite BL180 2500Kv motor, GWS 5030 prop and 2S 500mAh 30C battery. The 3000Kv BL180 motor would probably be even better yet but I didn’t have one available. I tried a GWS 5043 prop with the 2500Kv motor but didn’t see much difference in thrust and the battery was slightly more discharged.

Hacker HotWing 500 with Eflite BL180 brushless motor
Hacker HotWing 500 with Eflite BL180 brushless motor

Reinforcements, Top
I used the included carbon-fiber rods for reinforcing the middle portion of the wing. The white rod toward the front is leftover fiberglass rod from my Multiplex ParkMaster 3D. The fiberglass rod is more flexible so it can make tighter turns and still remain one piece. I had to reinforce the front section because of the inset battery.

Hacker HotWing 500 carbon-fiber and fiberglass rod layout (top view)
Hacker HotWing 500 carbon-fiber and fiberglass rod layout (top view)

Reinforcements and Electronics Layout, Bottom
I used a Spektrum AR400 receiver on its side and made a cutout, as shown in the photos. The AR400 receiver was almost the same width as the thickness of the wing so it’s almost flush with the top and bottom of the wing. I created pockets on top for the Common Sense RC 3g servos. I ran out of carbon-fiber rod otherwise I would have used it for the servo control rods. I also created a pocket for the T-motor 6A ESC.

Hacker HotWing 500 carbon-fiber and fiberglass rod layout (bottom view)
Hacker HotWing 500 carbon-fiber and fiberglass rod layout (bottom view)

Reinforcements Glued, Bottom
Slits were cut and all carbon-fiber and fiberglass rods glued in place with regular CA.

Hacker HotWing 500 carbon-fiber and fiberglass rod layout (glued)
Hacker HotWing 500 carbon-fiber and fiberglass rod layout (glued)

Paint Treatment and Features, Top
I cut the top of the wing fences down just as I have with 2 other flying wings. There doesn’t seem to be any advantage to having huge fences or winglets and it helps reduce weight aft of CG. I cut 2 slots on top for a battery strap, which are actually Inland Velcro Cable Ties from Fry’s Electronics. I use similar setups on other flying wings and it works well. I planned on using carbon-fiber rod for the servo control rods but ran out. I painted the leading edge and fences glow orange for better orientation and sight at distance. Yellow would have worked too.

Hacker HotWing 500 with painted leading edge and wing fences
Hacker HotWing 500 with painted leading edge and wing fences

Paint Treatment, Bottom
I paint the typical black invasion stripes on the bottom of the wings on almost every RC aircraft I purchase that doesn’t already have them. This helps me with orientation at distance.

Hacker HotWing 500 with black painted invasion stripes on bottom
Hacker HotWing 500 with black painted invasion stripes on bottom

Overview
The Hacker HotWing 500 is a great li’l flying wing. It will do most anything the 750 will do and performs equally as well. Like most flying wings, wind is hardly an issue. The HotWing 500 will easily fly in 8-10 MPH winds, with or without a gyro or stabilizer. EPP flying wings are hard to beat for performance and durability!

Hacker HotWing 500 Videos

Update, May 2015
This Hacker HotWing 500 has now been converted to an FPV flying wing after handing it down to my stepson.

Close-ups, Feedback and Reviews
To be more mobile friendly, photos on TazRC are limited in size. I would be happy to post any close-up photos on request. Just leave a comment below. Also, feel free to leave your feedback or personal review on the Hacker HotWing 500. Registration not required.

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